Sinopsis

The Humanist Hour (HH) Audio Podcast is a monthly one-hour talk show produced by the American Humanist Association. Every episode of the HH Audio Podcast explores a different area of humanist thought, from politics to pop culture.

Episodios

  • The Humanist Hour #197: Josiah Mannion and Baba Brinkman on Art and Activism

    The Humanist Hour #197: Josiah Mannion and Baba Brinkman on Art and Activism

    01/06/2016

    Art has the potential to reach people in ways no simple argument can. As such, it's always been harnessed for activist pursuits. From design that adds impact to a message, to providing the sugar coating on an educational pill, to telling us stories we need to hear – activism needs art. Humanist activism is no exception. On this week's show, we talk to two artists whose art exists for far more than art's sake. Stephanie Zvan talks to Josiah Mannion about his photography and his motto, "I take pictures of humans. This is my Humanism." Later, Kim Ellington talks with Baba Brinkman about his album "The Rap Guide to Religion" and about having his work peer-reviewed by scientists. (Photo of Josiah courtesy of Lindsey Ford)

  • The Humanist Hour #196: HB2, The Public Facilities Privacy  Security Act

    The Humanist Hour #196: HB2, The Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act

    25/05/2016

    Of all the recent "religious freedom" legislation passed around the country, perhaps none is so restrictive as North Carolina's "Act to Provide for Single-sex Multiple Occupancy Bathroom and Changing Facilities in Schools and Public Agencies and to Create Statewide Consistency in Regulation of Employment and Public Accommodations". The short version of the bill's name is the "Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act," but it quickly became infamous as HB2. Passed as a response to a non-discrimination ordinance enacted by the city of Charlotte, HB2 removed the protections under that law and others like it, attempted to redefine "sex" under the law, and barred transgender people from using restrooms on state property that conform to their gender. The legal and economic consequences to North Carolina were swift, but so far, neither the legislature nor the governor shows any willingness to overturn the bill. On this week's show, Jenn Wilson and Peggy Knudtson talk to Chris Brook, Legal Director of the American

  • The Humanist Hour #195: David Cobb on Corporate Personhood

    The Humanist Hour #195: David Cobb on Corporate Personhood

    18/05/2016

    David Cobb is a lawyer and co-founder of Move to Amend, a coalition dedicated to winning a constitutional amendment to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights. He has sued corporate polluters, lobbied elected officials, run for political office himself, and been arrested for non-violent civil disobedience. He believes we must use every tool available to effect the systemic social change we so desperately need. In 2002, David ran for Attorney General of Texas, pledging to use the office to revoke the charters of corporations that repeatedly violate health, safety, and environmental laws. In 2004, he ran for President of the United States on the Green Party ticket and successfully campaigned for the Ohio recount. At the AHA’s 2015 Annual Conference in Denver, David discussed the legal doctrine of "corporate constitutional rights" and the idea that money should be treated as speech. He contended that these illegitimate, ir

  • The Humanist Hour #194: American Humanist Association’s 75th Anniversary Conference

    The Humanist Hour #194: American Humanist Association’s 75th Anniversary Conference

    04/05/2016

    This year is a special one for the American Humanist Association – it marks 75 years since our founding. To celebrate, our annual conference returns to the AHA's original home of Chicago this May 26–29 with lots to do for everyone. In addition to being AHA's Director of Development and Communications, Maggie Ardiente also organizes AHA's annual conference. She took time this week out of her busy schedule to talk to us about the history of the conference, what attendees can expect, how to make the most of your conference experience, and the kinds of political considerations that go into creating a conference like this.

  • The Humanist Hour #193: Carrie Poppy and Ross Blocher

    The Humanist Hour #193: Carrie Poppy and Ross Blocher

    20/04/2016

    "We show up so you don't have to." That's the tagline for the Oh No, Ross and Carrie podcast. If you've ever wanted to get out and experience all the world's weirdness for yourself, this podcast might not be for you. If, however, you've been dying to have other people put themselves through that and then tell you about it, you're in the right place. Skeptics Ross Blocher and Carrie Poppy are ready to experience it all (or almost all) for you and share all the best stories afterward. On this week's Humanist Hour, Carrie and Ross join us to talk about how they got started, the roles compassion and honesty play in their skepticism, and a few of their favorite episodes. They also tell us just what they are and aren't willing to do for an episode.

  • The Humanist Hour #192: The Humanism of Star Trek, with Susan Sackett  Scott Lohman

    The Humanist Hour #192: The Humanism of Star Trek, with Susan Sackett & Scott Lohman

    06/04/2016

    Gene Roddenberry was openly humanist, and his best-known creation, Star Trek, reflects his views in many ways. Our guests this week talk about how Star Trek informed their humanism and how they use the show to educate others about humanism. Susan Sackett became Roddenberry's executive assistant in the mid-1970s and a humanist shortly thereafter. She contributed story ideas for two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation and worked with Roddenberry until his death. She joins us to talk about her career with Roddenberry, working with some of the Star Trek original series actors, and her career in humanism after Roddenberry's death. Sackett also serves on the AHA Board of Directors. Scott Lohman is the former president of the Humanists of Minnesota and a self-professed “serious geek.” He runs Diversicon, a science fiction convention in Minnesota, and gives presentations on humanist principles using examples from Star Trek. He joins us to talk about teaching Star Trek to children at Camp Quest.

  • The Humanist Hour #191: Sincere Kirabo on Building Social Justice

    The Humanist Hour #191: Sincere Kirabo on Building Social Justice

    23/03/2016

    Over the past year or so, the American Humanist Association has been making changes to reflect its commitment to social justice. These changes can be found in the pages of The Humanist magazine and the words of its leaders. Change can also be found more recently in the announcement that Sincere Kirabo would be stepping into the role of the AHA's social justice coordinator. This week, we welcome Sincere back to the show. He speaks with Peggy Knudtson and Jenn Wilson about his new role, what social justice and intersectionality mean, and the ways that social media can be used to further the cause of social justice.

  • The Humanist Hour #190: Getting SciCurious with Bethany Brookshire

    The Humanist Hour #190: Getting "SciCurious" with Bethany Brookshire

    09/03/2016

    On this week's show, Stephanie Zvan interviews Dr. Bethany "SciCurious" Brookshire about effective strategies for convincing people of scientific truths, the common mistakes we make when we set out to teach people about science. Brookshire recently co-edited Science Blogging: The Essential Guide. For nearly a decade, former neuroscientist Dr. Bethany Brookshire has been writing about science for online audiences. Best known to science-blogging fans as "SciCurious," Dr. Brookshire writes about – among other topics – neurotransmitters (the chemicals that make our brains run), evaluating scientific results in context, rats in tiny pants, and duck penises. You can't forget the duck penises.

  • The Humanist Hour #189: Justin Scott on Interviewing Presidential Candidates

    The Humanist Hour #189: Justin Scott on Interviewing Presidential Candidates

    24/02/2016

    In this week's show, Stephanie Zvan introduces interviewer Peggy Knudtson, and Peggy and Jenn Wilson talk to Justin Scott about his work to get politicians on record on the separation of church and state. As an Iowan, activist, and atheist, Justin Scott has had a unique opportunity to represent nontheists in the political process. The timing of the Iowa caucuses means that 2016 presidential candidates spend a lot of time answering questions from average citizens, and Scott has used this opportunity to press the candidates on church-state separation and issues of religious privilege. His YouTube videos of the candidate's answers have propelled the debate over religion in the public sphere into the headlines.

  • The Humanist Hour #188: Black Nonbelievers: The Authors Circle

    The Humanist Hour #188: Black Nonbelievers: The Author's Circle

    10/02/2016

    In this episode, Jenn Wilson introduces our new producer, Stephanie Zvan, and Kim Ellington talks to Frank Edwards, Ronald F. Murphy, Cheryl Abram, and Darrell Smith – authors who presented at the Black Nonbelievers fifth anniversary celebration in Atlanta last month. On January 16, 2016, Black Nonbelievers from all over gathered together in Atlanta to celebrate the organization’s five year anniversary. One of the day's panels focused on black atheist and humanist authors. Kim Ellington attended the anniversary celebration and took the opportunity to talk to these panelists. --- Frank Edwards is the author of the Jupiter Strong series, books designed for children and parents. The focus of this series was to showcase images of African people in dignifying terms and rebuild family values. From our series, children will learn critical thinking skills, self love, communal responsibility and have fun doing it! --- Ronald F. Murphy, one of three children born to Raymond and Catherine Murphy, was raised in the

  • The Humanist Hour #187: Critically Thinking About the Self-Help Genre

    The Humanist Hour #187: Critically Thinking About the Self-Help Genre

    27/01/2016

    In this episode, Bo Bennett has a conversation with Dr. Michael Britt about the genre of books and programs known as “self-help,” a roughly $11 billion industry. As Bo says, the self-help movement is not much different from many religious movements, and, like many religions, self-help does have some good things to offer. The key is to be knowledgeable in this area and to think critically. Bo’s guest, Michael Britt, has a Ph.D. in psychology from The State University of New York at Albany (specialization in social and industrial/organizational psychology). He is an adjunct professor in psychology and runs the most popular psychology podcast, The Psych Files.

  • The Humanist Hour #186: Mark Smith on Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics

    The Humanist Hour #186: Mark Smith on Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics

    20/01/2016

    In this episode, Kim Ellington welcomes new Humanist Hour co-host Jenn Wilson to the podcast and they both speak with author Dr. Mark Smith about his new book, "Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics." Mark A. Smith provocatively argues that religion is not nearly the unchanging conservative influence in American politics that we have come to think it is. In fact, in the long run, religion is best understood as responding to changing political and cultural values rather than shaping them. Smith makes his case by charting five contentious issues in America’s history: slavery, divorce, homosexuality, abortion, and women’s rights. For each, he shows how the political views of even the most conservative Christians evolved in the same direction as the rest of society—perhaps not as swiftly, but always on the same arc. During periods of cultural transition, Christian leaders do resist prevailing values and behaviors, but those same leaders inevitably acquiesce—often by reinterpreting

  • The Humanist Hour #185: The Sociology of Religion, with Dr. Ryan T. Cragun

    The Humanist Hour #185: The Sociology of Religion, with Dr. Ryan T. Cragun

    13/01/2016

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Kim Ellington speak with Associate Professor of Sociology Ryan T. Cragun about the sociology of religion. Are religious people more generous than the non-religious? Smarter? Better looking? (Actually, we don’t ask that last one) Ryan T. Cragun is a husband, father, and sociologist of religion (in order of importance). Originally from Utah, he now lives in Florida and works at the University of Tampa. His research and writing focuses on religion, with an emphasis on Mormonism and the nonreligious. His research has been published in a variety of academic journals, including: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Sociology of Religion, Nova Religio, Journal of Religion and Health, and Journal of Contemporary Religion. When he's not working, he's spending time with his wife and son, watching science fiction, hiking, playing soccer, or tinkering with FOSS, Gnu/Linux, or computer hardware. Cragun is the author of two books: What You Don’t Know About Religion (but Should) (2

  • The Humanist Hour #184: White Nights, Black Paradise, with Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson

    The Humanist Hour #184: White Nights, Black Paradise, with Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson

    06/01/2016

    In this episode, Kim Ellington speaks with author and activist Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson about her latest book, "White Nights, Black Paradise", and the state of race in America today. Later, Peggy Knudtson speaks with Dr. Richard Carrier about the “evidence” of miracles. Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson is an American feminist, atheist and author. She is the author of "Godless Americana: Race and Religious Rebels" (2013), "Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics, and the Values Wars" (2011), and "Imagining Transit: Race, Gender, and Transportation Politics in Los Angeles (Travel Writing Across the Disciplines)" (2003). Moral Combat is the first book on atheism to be published by an African-American woman. In 2013 she was named Secular Woman of the year. Dr. Richard Carrier is a world-renowned author and speaker. As a professional historian, published philosopher, and prominent defender of the American freethought movement, Dr. Carrier has appeared across the U.S., Canada and the U.K., and on American television and

  • The Humanist Hour #183: Dr. Dan Everett—Don’t Sleep, There Are Snakes

    The Humanist Hour #183: Dr. Dan Everett—Don’t Sleep, There Are Snakes

    29/12/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Peggy Knudtson speak with author Dr. Daniel Everett. Dr. Everett is an American author and academic best known for his study of the Amazon Basin's Pirahã people and their language. He serves as Dean of Arts and Sciences at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts. Daniel L. (Dan) Everett holds a ScD and a Masters of Linguistics from the Universidade Estadual in Campinas (UNICAMP), both based upon years of field research among the Pirahã people of the Brazilian Amazon jungle. He taught as an instructor and later Assistant Professor at UNI-CAMP, 1981-1986, until leaving Brazil to return to the USA. He next was appointed full professor of linguistics and anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh, where he also chaired the Department of Linguistics until 1999. At that time, Dan moved to the Amazon to live the majority of the next three years in the jungle among the Pirahãs. He left the jungle when the University of Manchester, England, offered him the position of Professor

  • The Humanist Hour #182: Secular Comedy with Stewart Huff

    The Humanist Hour #182: Secular Comedy with Stewart Huff

    23/12/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Peggy Knudtson speak with comedian Stewart Huff about the joys and pains of performing liberal, secular comedy across the country, especially in places that aren’t so, well… liberal or secular. Stewart Huff was born in Campbellsville, Kentucky and grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee. He has been performing comedy for over 15 years, beginning when he decided to drop out of college to become a writer. Currently touring theatres, comedy clubs and special events across the country, Huff reaches past the norm for his genuine — and genuinely unexpected — comedy. His knack for embracing the foibles of humanity and his refreshing originality make him as likeable as he is hilarious. A storyteller at heart, Huff continues to amaze with his clever material and personal wit. Huff has performed in comedy clubs nationally and internationally, including the Improv in Los Angeles and New York, the Punchline in Atlanta and the Funny Bone in Omaha, as well as countless others. A finalist in the 2

  • The Humanist Hour #181: Atheist Meditation and Spirituality, with Mark W. Gura

    The Humanist Hour #181: Atheist Meditation and Spirituality, with Mark W. Gura

    16/12/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Kim Ellington speak with Mark W. Gura, a Secular Buddhist, humanist, and freethinker. They talk about a “woo-free” version of mediation and spirituality. Mark W. Gura has more than 20 years of experience in practicing mindfulness meditation. He is the Executive Director of the nonprofit Association of Mindfulness Meditation and Secular Buddhism. He is also an atheist, humanist, freethinker and practitioner of vipassana, a mindfulness meditation technique that was developed more than 2,500 years ago and does not require faith in gurus, religion, God(s), or the supernatural.

  • The Humanist Hour #180: Everybody is Wrong About God, with Dr. James A. Lindsay

    The Humanist Hour #180: Everybody is Wrong About God, with Dr. James A. Lindsay

    09/12/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Peggy Knudtson speak with author James A, Lindsay about his new book, Everybody is Wrong About God. Later, Kim Ellington speaks with Derek Colanduno, director of the Skeptical track at DragonCon. James A. Lindsay is an author and outspoken atheist voice who holds degrees in physics and mathematics, including a doctorate in the latter. Motivated by a love of knowledge and learning, along with his life experience of growing up and living in the Southeastern United States--on the buckle of the Bible Belt, as they say--he writes and speaks in an attempt to clarify our religious and cultural landscape and by doing so to help heal the related harms.

  • The Humanist Hour #179: The Myths that Stole Christmas, with Dr. David Kyle Johnson

    The Humanist Hour #179: The Myths that Stole Christmas, with Dr. David Kyle Johnson

    02/12/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett and Kim Ellington interview Dr. David Kyle Johnson about his new book, "The Myths that Stole Christmas: Seven Misconceptions that Hijacked the Holiday (and How We Can Take It Back)". Later, Humanist Hour correspondent Patty Traynor interviews Kevin Davis, executive director of Young Skeptics. Dr. David Kyle Johnson is an associate professor of philosophy at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, and is also a professor for The Great Courses. His courses include Exploring Metaphysics (2014) and The Big Questions of Philosophy (2016). In addition to being the author of The Myths that Stole Christmas, he also blogs for Psychology Today, has written and edited extensively for Wiley-Blackwell’s Philosophy and Pop Culture series, and has a popular Authors@Google talk on the movie Inception. He has published work in journals such as Religious Studies, Sophia, Philo, Think, and Science, Religion and Culture regarding metaphysics and philosophy of religion. Kevin Davis is the head

  • The Humanist Hour #178: Dr. Abby Hafer on Unintelligent Design

    The Humanist Hour #178: Dr. Abby Hafer on Unintelligent Design

    25/11/2015

    In this episode, Bo Bennett speaks with Dr. Abby Hafer live, in studio, about her new book, "The Not-So-Intelligent Designer: Why Evolution Explains the Human Body and Intelligent Design Does Not." Dr. Hafer is a speaker, writer, and humorist who particularly loves taking about Intelligent Design & Creationism, the politics surrounding them, and science denialism in general. A few years ago she realized that Intelligent Design is a political pressure group, not a scientific issue. With this figured out, she realized that what we need are political-style arguments in defense of evolution. Her presentations contain bulletproof science, and she uses humor to puncture bad arguments. Crucial questions are raised, such as, “Why do men's testicles have such a bad location?” and, “Who does God like better, us—or squid?” She finds that once she mentions testicles, everybody pays attention. Dr. Hafer has given talks at the American Humanist Association’s Annual Conferences in 2009 and 2011, and at the American Athei

página 2 de 8

Informações: